© 2018 Generous support for this symposium provided by Humanities Montana, The Foundation for Community Vitality and The Montana History Foundation 

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SPEAKERS

Philip Beaumont, Jr.  M.A.

(1991) in Native American Studies, University of Arizona.Enrolled Tribal member in the Crow (Apsáalooke) Tribe.  Author (master’s thesis) on Chief Sits in the Middle of the Land: One Man’s Valiant Efforts to Negotiate for his Crow People: the Outcomes in Decades to Follow.  Has taught courses from elementary to college levels.  Currently is an independent artist.

Alden Big Man.  Ph.D. 

(2011) and M.A. (2001) in History, University of New Mexico.Enrolled Tribal member in the Crow (Apsáalooke) Tribe.  Author of (dissertation) Crow History, 1700-1950: a Political and Social Battle to Retain Their Culture and (master’s thesis) Curley: Crow Scout for Custer. Has assisted and taught Native American Studies, Crow Studies, and History courses at Little Big Horn College, Fort Berthold Community College, and the University of New Mexico. Has done Native American curriculum development for public schools, and has been a consultant for contemporary programs relating to Tribal operations, markets, human resources, natural resources, and historic preservation.

Frederick E. Hoxie.  Ph.D.

(1977) in History of American Civilization, and M.A. (1976) in American Studies, Brandeis University.   Professor Emeritus, University of Illinois, Urbana/Champaign.  Was Director, D'Arcy McNickle Center for the History of the American Indian, The Newberry Library.  Nationally-recognized scholar and teacher and author of the best book to date on Crow history: Parading Through History, The Making of the Crow Nation in America, 1805-1935 (1995).  He is the author of many other books, including editor of Encyclopedia of the North American Indian (1996), American Nations: Encounters in Indian Country, 1850-2000 (2001), and Oxford Handbook of American Indian History (2016).

Tim Bernardis.  M.Ed.

(1987) Adult and Higher Education, Montana State University Bozeman; B.A. (1981) in History and also B.A. (1981) in Native American Studies, University of California, Berkeley.  Library Director, Little Big Horn College (1985-present);.  Has been an Adjunct Faculty Instructor in Crow Studies and History, LBHC.  Author of many articles, including “Battle of the Rosebud” and “Fetterman Fight” in Encyclopedia of the American Indian (1996); author of Crow Social Studies Baleeisbaalichiwee History(1986) for the Bilingual Materials Development Center, and (with Frederick E. Hoxie) “Robert Yellowtail” in The New Warriors, Native American Leaders Since 1900 (2001). Adopted member of the Plainfeather family in the Crow (Apsáalooke) Tribe.

C. Adrian Heidenreich.  Ph.D.

(1971) and M.A. (1967) in Anthropology with minor work in Visual Communication from the University of Oregon; held a Post-doctoral Fellowship at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. He is Professor Emeritus, Dept. of Sociology, Political Science, & Native American Studies, Montana State University Billings. Author of many articles, including “The Crow Indian Delegation to Washington, D. C., in 1880” in Montana, the Magazine of Western History (1981); and “Western Tipi Pole of Crow Country" in the North American Fur Trade Conference Proceedings (2012). Adopted member of the Big Day family in the Crow (Apsáalooke) Tribe.

Sharon Stewart-Peregoy M.Ed.

(2002) in Education (Emphasis on Curriculum and Instruction), City University at Seattle.  Enrolled Tribal member in the Crow (Apsáalooke) Tribe.  Professional experience includes working as Director of Title III Program at Little Big Horn College, Coordinator for Crow Tobacco Prevention Program, Director of Crow Tribal Health Department, and Research/ Development Specialist for Office of Economic Development of the Crow Tribe. She is an advocate for the revitalization of Crow language and culture on the Reservation. She has been an elected member of the Montana State Senate and currently is a member of the Montana House of Representatives.

Dale Old Horn.  M.S

(1975) in Linguistics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  Enrolled Tribal member in the Crow (Apsáalooke) Tribe. Author of (master’s thesis) Some Complement Constructions of the Crow Indian Language.  Author of Music and Dance of the Crow Indians (1999), Baaanniile (The Direction of the Path of the People) (1986), and  Apsáalooke Social and Family Structure (1995). Has been Department Head of Crow Studies and Social Studies at Little Big Horn College.  He was Chairman of the Native American Studies program, Montana State University, Billings.  Dale was also Crow Tribal historic preservation officer.  Is a popular emcee/announcer on the Indian powwow circuit both nationwide (U.S. and Canada) and at home in Montana.